US Army plans to use laser weapons to shoot down drones and helicopters

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According to a military report, laser-armed vehicles will be ready for service in 2022.

The high energy lasers will be installed on US Army Stryker armored weapons, the light emitted by the weapon will simply melt down enemy drones and aircraft. Despite the destructive power the energy expenditure will also be high.

Each laser cannon will need 50 kilowatts of power, which is enough to power three houses.

“The time is now to get directed energy weapons to the battlefield,” Lt. Gen. L. Neil Thurgood, Director of Hypersonics, Directed Energy, Space and Rapid Acquisition, said in an Army report. “The Army recognizes the need for directed energy lasers as part of the Army’s modernization plan. This is no longer a research effort or a demonstration effort. It is a strategic combat capability, and we are on the right path to get it in Soldiers’ hands.”

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US Army begins testing of laser weapon that can burn drones, helicopters and aircraft in preparation for its deployment in 2022 on four Stryker armored vehicles.

The Army is setting an ambitious timetable for deploying laser weapons on Strykers, an approach that is indicative of a broad Army push to better expedite weapons delivery. The service expects to have operational lasers ready to deploy on Strykers by 2022, if not earlier. The strategy is to harvest and deliver mature weapons systems on an accelerated time frame while of course preserving the steps and key procedures necessary for successful deployment. This strategy is, not surprisingly, driven by the current threat scenario.

The plan to use weapons based on this technology has been under development for several years, with unmanned aerial vehicles being small and agile and difficult to take down with conventional weaponry.

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