Are you Ready? Showdown over Iran means false flag vigilance is required – a brief history in the Middle East

By Dragoljub Bosnic

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By Dragoljub Bosnic – The US has been adamant in its struggle for “human rights, freedom and democracy”. Despite this, there has been a large amount of controversy surrounding both the pretexts and the proclaimed goals of the US foreign policy. In light of current events, we have a seemingly unclear situation.
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The US claims that an RQ-4A Global Hawk BAMS-D advanced ISR (intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance) drone, which is an early prototype of the new MQ-4C Triton, has been shot down over the strait of Hormuz while in international airspace.
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On the other hand, Iran claims the the UAV (unmanned aerial vehicle) violated its airspace and was thus shot down, probably by a Khordad-3 SAM (surface-to-air) system (very similar in function and appearance to the Russian BUK-M1).
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Whatever the truth is in this case, the US government has not explained what is the purpose of having an advanced spy drone so close to Iranian airspace (or within it). How would the US react if an Iranian spy drone came close to the US airspace?
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This comes days after the Japanese “Kokuka Courageous” and Norwegian “Front Altair” oil tankers were attacked, allegedly with limpet mines or flying objects, sustaining fire damage. Saudi Arabia and the US were quick to accuse Iran for the attack, despite the fact that Iranian personnel participated in the tanker crews rescue operation.
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It is also quite unclear why would Iran, which according to the US is highly dependent on oil trade, want to torpedo its own economy by attacking oil tankers, without which its oil trade is impossible. Despite 40 years of US sanctions, Iran is much more stable than most of its neighbors. Turkey has a decades-old conflict with the Kurds; Armenia and Azerbaijan have been in a state of perpetual conflict since at least 1988; Afghanistan is in a near constant war; Pakistan has had numerous security issues since it gained independence in 1947; and Iraq has not been stable since the US-led invasion in 2003.
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Instability in all those countries has largely contributed to the migrant crisis in Europe. How would an American-led attack on a rarely peaceful Middle Eastern nation make anything better? Let’s check out how other recent US “adventures” helped the Middle East:
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Iraq Starting in 2003 (With Afghanistan). The US and the UK alleged that Iraq has been developing weapons of mass destruction, including chemical and biological weapons. The hype began after the false flag attack on the Twin Towers on September 11th. While Saudis were involved in the actual hijacking, the action was pinned to Osama Bin Laden. While he was also at odds with Afghan authorities, this somehow placed the entire country as a target for invasion and occupation of Afghanistan. The then US Secretary of State Colin Powell even gave a speech in the UN while holding a model vial of anthrax. The invasion went on as planned in 2003, yet to this day, a single evidence of Iraqi WMDs has not been found. The results of the war were catastrophic. There are various estimates, ranging from around 250.000 dead up to 1 million dead by 2011 only. Yet, we may argue that the rise of ISIS has been the direct consequence of the US-led invasion of Iraq, which means the number of casualties is much higher in reality.
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Libya: In 2011, a civil war broke out in Libya (instigated by foreign actors), which was allegedly caused by the February 19th incident, likely a false flag where, for no logical reason, Gaddafi’s forces on a helicopter gunboat opened fire on protesters.
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This gave US and NATO a pretext to enforce a so-called No-fly Zone, which in reality meant bombing of regular Libyan Armed Forces. The legal Libyan government, led by Colonel Gaddafi was overthrown, with Gaddafi being gruesomely killed by a mob in October 2011. The result was an incessant warfare which is still ongoing, with tens of thousands killed and millions displaced. This has also triggered a migration crisis in Southern Europe, with tens of thousands of migrants trying to reach Europe via boats and thousands perishing in Mediterranean in the process.  Libya today is a hot mess, with disastrous reports on human rights violations, including Africans being sold as slaves in various slave markets.
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Syria: In 2011, a ‘civil war’ broke out in Syria (just as with Libya, foreign actors involved), which was quickly exposed as an invasion, and the conflict is still ongoing. Syrian president, Bashar Al Assad has been accused of using chemical weapons against civilians, which in fact continue in what are no doubt a series of false flags. In order to disprove this claim, in 2013, with Russian assistance, Syria destroyed its stockpile of chemical weapons, which was confirmed by a UN commission.
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However, Western countries are claiming chemical attacks are still ongoing, yet there has been no clear evidence to support this claim. Despite this, the US-led coalition used these alleged attacks as a pretext to further occupy parts of the Syrian territory, as well as to bomb Syrian Arab Army, while also supporting various terrorist groups, most of which have been connected to ISIS or Al-Qaeda.
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The result is a war which is still ongoing, and which left hundreds of thousands dead, millions displaced and most of Syrian infrastructure and economy destroyed. Rebuilding efforts are only now underway. 
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Conclusion: Recent historical experience and current events happening in the Persian Gulf indicate another pretext for yet another war is in the making. If we consider all the death and destruction that the so-called struggle for “freedom and democracy” has brought to countless millions of people, can we say that another war is going to make anything better?
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Imagine the exponentially greater chaos and another catastrophic migrant crisis in case this nation of 80 million was attacked. We actually might be able to prevent yet another tragedy if we are vigilant about the likelihood of a false flag against Iran. This means going out of our way to not just ‘like’ articles exposing false flags as well as anti-imperialist reporting and analysis, it means sharing this to make sure that others see them. Critical in the war is the so-called ‘information war’, and in this theater we have the potential to inoculate countless people from the influence of war-hawkish mainstream media. 
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