Syria’s First Lady, Asma Assad, Diagnosed with Breast Cancer

Mandatory Credit: Photo by Sipa Press/REX/Shutterstock (782226f) Syrian President Bashar al-Assad and his wife Asma al-Assad Post Mediterranean Summit dinner, Petit Palais, Paris, France - 13 Jul 2008 French President Nicolas Sarkozy and 42 leaders launched a union between Europe and its Mediterranean neighbours but tensions among Middle East countries could undermine the grand plan
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The official account of the presidency of the Syrian Arab Republic on Twitter announced on 8 August that Bashar Assad’s wife, Asma, has been diagnosed with a malignant breast tumor.

The 42-year-old Syrian first lady has started treatment for early-stage breast cancer, the official Twitter account said on the presidency news release, also posting a picture of a hospital in Damascus.

The same photo of Asma with her husband, Syrian leader Bashar Assad, was shared on Asma’s Instagram account with social media users wishing for a speedy recovery.

Asma, mother of three, was born in London, United Kingdom in 1975 to Syrian parents, and graduated from King’s College in 1996 with a bachelor’s degree in computer science and French literature.

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After graduation, she started a career as an economics analyst at the Deutsche Bank Group. In 1998, Asma joined JP Morgan’s investment banking division and was hired to pursue an MBA at Harvard, but met Bashar al-Assad and moved to Syria.

Because the cancer was discovered in a very early stage, Asma Assad is expected to make a full recovery.

Despite this, jihadists and their supporters have flooded social networks with calls that Asma die a painful death. To their disappointment, this is most likely not the case.

This news comes as the Syrian Army is preparing to clear out the last major bastion of jihadism in the country in the northwest province of Idlib. If reports suggesting an imminent Syrian offensive are true, then no amount of online mockery and propaganda will save terrorist forces from defeat in what Syrian officials have called a key battle to ending the war in Syria.

Idlib province was overrun in early 2015 by a coalition of terrorist groups who mobilized in Turkey before crossing the border to wreak havoc and expel the Syrian Army. With southern Syria completely liberated, the only significant jihadist forces left in the country are gathered in Idlib province and adjacent areas.

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