Italian Electoral Uprising – Anti-globalist Eurosceptics sweep

Is 'Putin's Brain' Dugin, becoming King-Maker in Europe?

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by James Porrazzo and Raphael Machado, New Resistance

The 2018 Italian election may have just put the European Union on its heels. It seems like not even having 8 billion dollars plus in resources can stop the populist rise in Europe. Or help a lost cause out-think a combination of populist young charismatic candidates, possibly with a little help from Kremlin strategists, win the Italian election. It’s interesting to note that just like meetings with leaders of the AfD, Russian fringe philosopher ‘at large’, Alexander Dugin met with Salvini prior to his surprise gains.  The Israeli liberal ‘soft-Zionist’ rag Ha’aretz yesterday ran a hit-piece editorial, with the sensationalist headline: “Vladimir Putin Just Won Italy’s Election”. This gives us a pretty good sense of the establishment spin on this upset election result.

In what’s surely sending shock waves through the EU headquarters in Brussels, two anti-establishment, Eurosceptic and, in one case extremely pro-Russian parties, Movimento 5 Stelle and Lega, have won a combined estimate of over 49% of the electoral vote in Italy, with billionaire led Forza Italia barely grabbing 13%.

Check out the Italian electoral map which shows M5S firmly in control of the votes of the south of the country while Lega has, not surprisingly considering they were formerly named Lega Nord, performing their best in the north, where they were part of the Center-Right.

 

The ‘center-right’ was a previously agreed to coalition ticket which results in adding Salvini’s Lega with Berlusconi’s Forza Italia. This means that the single greatest victor was M5S – the Five Star Movement.

The Italian left were largely a non-factor. The question remains who will take the role of Prime Minister, with many analysts thinking it will likely be the leader of Lega Matteo Salvini, despite M5S taking more votes in the election, due to M5S’s unwillingness to put together a coalition government, something which violates a cornerstone of their platform.

Under Italy’s new election laws a party or coalition of parties must have 40% or more of the votes to name a Prime Minister, a number which M5S doesn’t seem to have won on their own. Salvini is young and charismatic, well-known for what the mainstream media describes as pro-populist, and anti-EU views (rather famously telling an Italian TV reporter, on-air, ‘The EU can go f*ck itself’!), with an eye on toughening immigration laws and bringing Italy closer to Russia, who he has made no attempt to hide his fondness for.

This reflects in his recent remarks on foreign policy, which include recognizing Crimea as part of Russia, wanting to reconsider Italy’s role in NATO, and many other views, and his quite publicized meeting with Alexander Dugin, repeatedly referred in the West as “Putin’s Brain”, which left both sides singing the other’s praises.

The Luigi Di Maio led M5S is no less interesting, with a large part of their program devoted to providing basic (universal) income to all Italian citizens, a ferocious attitude towards Italian political corruption and a leadership under Di Maio who is also young – at just 31, smart and passionate.

No matter if Lega or M5S take the Prime Minister role, a ray of light appears to be breaking through the clouds in Italy – a light that says Brexit may have just been the beginning, and despite Macron’s win in France, the normal working people of Europe are quickly losing faith in what the EU has to offer, and we may be witnessing the beginning of a return to a Europe of more independent nations. Demonstrating once again that we are right in our analysis, the Italian election that took place gave us another clear indication that the main contradiction of our era is represented by a tension between,  liberal globalism on the one hand, and,  the identity of the people on the other.

For this reason, the Italians drove out the parties of the establishment the main parties of international capitalist elites, en masse. Regardless of how the next government comes to be formed, what is clear is a nearly unanimous rejection of those rightly seen as defenders of the status quo.

The Italian outrage, however, was fragmented in support of various groups and anti-liberal oriented parties, mainly, once again, of Lega and the 5 Star Movement. Also deserving of mention were the smaller tickets of Casa Pound and the Communist Party.

All these are organizations have their own characteristics. The Lega is a regionalist organization that has already formerly been separatist. The 5 Star Movement is an expression of a centre-left populism, but borrows the uncompromising spirit from the hard-left, and important demands such as guaranteed income. This sort of demand will become more popular with time, as automation continues its course – one that ultimately leads with the elimination of manual labor. Casa Pound is a third position organization, which doesn’t fail to hide its affection for Mussolini. And the Communist Party is of a Stalinist orientation, even if they have in many cases fallen victim to Eurocommunism (radical in phrases, reformist in practice).

In spite of the notable differences, however, all of these organizations aroused interest in the Italian masses for what, for them, was some sort of alternative to the liberal policies of system parties, PD and FI.

To sum up, the Italian people voted for euroscepticism, for the marginalized, for criticism of NATO, and for criticism of an open immigration policy, driven by a disenchantment with Neo-Liberalism, which condemns numerous Italians to unemployment and countless small and medium-sized national companies to ruin.

Even if it is possible to expect from the two main victorious parties some level of ‘compromise’ for governability, since no one has won a clear majority, the Brussels and Washington elites definitely did not like the outcome of the elections. That is enough to find the outcome positive for the Italian people, and the world.

Stay tuned to Fort Russ for the latest news and developments from Italy and beyond as they emerge.

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