AdSense

  • Latest News

    September 9, 2016

    Pinatel interview part two: here comes a new equilibrium in the Mideast and Europe


    Le Figaro, July 29, 2016
    Translated by Tom Winter September 9, 2016
    [For Part One, click.]

    What's going on today in Syria? Russians and Americans seem to be getting closer together, at least on the question of the Al-Nusra Front, now very much in evidence near Aleppo. Is there going to be a new balance in the region?

    Ever since their intervention in September 2015, in the Syrian theater, the Russians have been pushing for strike coordination with the Americans against Daesh and Al Nosra. 
    The "moderate rebels" in Syria serve as the interface with Al Nusra, to whom they sell the weapons that they get from the CIA.
    But the American have refused, because on the political level, Obama has been wanting to maintain the fiction that there was still potential for moderate forces in the territory of Syria, forces that haven't been absorbed, or who were not allied to Al-Nusra and who can  therefore claim some day, to have a place at the table when it comes to negotiations. 

    It's an obvious fiction, a fiction contested not just by Russia, but by other voices, including in the United States. These experts affirm that the units that still exist in Syria serve as the interface with Al Nusra, to whom they sell the weapons that they get from the CIA. 

    It was the bombing of one of these bases in Syria by Russia the warned the US in advance so they could extract, with some urgency, the CIA agents, that allowed some operational rapprochement. It is clear that a new equilibrium is coming into being in the Middle East. Russia, which was historically present, is back, in force. China -- and here is something new -- is putting its nose in, and France, which used to have a privileged position there for mediation, has lost it through its alignment with the U.S. 

    What could be the place of Europe in the relations with the great nations of Russia and Turkey? Could one imagine a new security balance in the lands of Europe?

    It's true, our gates to the east are barred by Russia and Turkey. As for Russia, our economic and strategic interests are totally complementary. France has a long history of friendship with Russia, as symbolized by the Alexander III Bridge in Paris and in the more recent age, the Normandie Niemen Escadrille that Général de Gaulle insisted on sending to Russia to give substance to our alliance against Nazism.
    But the intention of the United States to bring back a Cold War climate in Europe, with is under development most notably via NATO, does not serve any interests but theirs and those of the European politocrats who are either corrupt or incompetent.
    I recall in addition that it was because the German Army was worn out by three years of war against Russia and the death of 13 million Russian soldiers and five million German that the invasion of June 1944 was able to succeed. This recollection does not mean in any case to minimize the role of the United States and the sacrifice of 185,924  U.S soldiers who died on European soil.  

    But the intention of the United States to bring back a Cold War climate in Europe, with is under development most notably via NATO, does not serve any interests but theirs and those of the European politocrats who are either corrupt or incompetent.

    As for Turkey, it is Germany that has historic relations, comparable to ours with Russia. Turkey and Germany were allies in the course of the two World Wars, as Germany wanted to cut off the allies' oil supplies with their help. The Turks, for their part, hoped to regain control of the Middle East, notably over Iraq and Syria.

    This historic background puts in evidence the importance of a Franco-German tandem to define a common European policy with regard to these powers, and to avoid a return the the old games, such as Angela Merkel seems to have done lately with the affair of the the refugees, dealing directly with Erdogan  without even talking to her European partners.





         Follow us on Facebook!                                                  
                  Facebook                                   

           Follow us on Twitter!
                  Twitter               

                 Donate!
    • Blogger Comments
    • Facebook Comments

    0 comments:

    Post a Comment

    Item Reviewed: Pinatel interview part two: here comes a new equilibrium in the Mideast and Europe Rating: 5 Reviewed By: Tom Winter
    Scroll to Top
    \